internet

Crisis of innovation: looking elsewhere

Publication date: 
25 September 2006
Type: 
conference paper

Considerable attention has been given in recent months to the complexity of issues surrounding broadband policy for Australia. While there appears to be widespread support that Australia needs to move from what might presently be called `rudimentary' or possibly `adequate' broadband, and largely only for urban dwellers, there are many calls for the urgent availability of `enabling' broadband. The unravelling of these terms depends upon what users expect from broadband, what speeds they require, and how much they are prepared to pay for the service.

Broadband : towards understanding users

Publication date: 
25 September 2007
Type: 
conference paper

This paper suggests that the forgotten domain of the complex and vigorous debates about the future of higher speed broadband in Australia is the experience and expectations of users and consumers with broadband. Research to date about such user experiences, especially in Australia, has essentially concentrated on Internet services and mainly with narrowband users. Yet Internet is not broadband. We, in Australia, have much to learn from recent European experiences with broadband.

Is YouTube truly the future?

Authors: 
Henry Jenkins
Publication date: 
25 June 2008
Type: 
article

YouTube: home port for lip-syncers, karaoke singers, trainspotters, birdwatchers, skateboarders, hip-hoppers, small-time wrestling federations, educators, third-wave feminists, churches, proud parents, poetry slammers, gamers, human rights activists, hobbyists. It gets 10 hours of new content every minute. Where did all that come from ask Henry Jenkins and John Hartley.

Internet and e-commerce law

Authors: 
Anne Fitzgerald, Timothy Beale, Yee Fen Lim, Gaye Middleton
Publication date: 
14 November 2007
Type: 
book

The last ten years have seen the internet and e-commerce emerge as central features of our commercial, social and cultural life. Developments such as Web 2.0, the semantic web, e-government strategies, user generated content, virtual worlds and online social networks have reshaped the way we communicate, interact and transact.

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